Monthly Archives: October 2018

Frank Arnold – Abstract Figurative Artist

By Marilyn Hurst

Frank Arnold - Looking-Manarnold1000Frank Arnold is an abstract figurative painter and sculptor. His work is haunting, bold, bright, and imbued with allegorical symbolism. It is also dark and pulls obliquely from his unconscious – abstract intellectualism personified.

Frank has also produced two books, the first, “Frank Arnold Speaks” is a bilingual, English and Spanish biography reflecting back on his youth as an adopted child, and on his life experiences and the impact it’s had on his artwork.

 

His second book, “Your Creative Imagination Unlocked,” is a collaborative with depth psychologist, Dr. Jim Manganiello. It’s an exploration of his own creative process with observations and hypotheses by Manganiello respective of Frank’s work as well as that of other abstract artists, Cy Twombly, Wassily Kandinsky, Pablo Picasso, Mark Rothko and Banksy. His book explores the deeper mind and how art can be a path to rediscovery of creative imagination. Frank was born in Long Beach, California, raised in the San Joaquin Valley and now has galleries in California and Mexico.

Frank graciously shared his time with us, and his personal insight into the creative process.


When did you get into the fine arts and what inspired you to do so?

It all began for me with a love of color. As a child I won a flower arranging contest at the fair. I was so taken by all the colors and the possible combinations. I have to think that was the true starting point for me.  I got into fine art in school. That was back in the days where if you talked too much, give you more art classes. “Put Frankie in art class because he talks too much.” I was kind of board with school, but my daydreaming fed my creative side and I grew to love art.

Did you ever paint traditionally or figurative work, 
or did you plunge into abstraction right away?

I was classically trained in realism, both painting and drawing. What I found, aside from the fact that realism is a lot of hard work, is there are so many rules to follow. I wanted something to come from my soul. At first I was painting from my surface mind and it was all about me. As I began to work from my deeper mind, I began to feel something was coming to me from another place, something I call gifts from my soul. I can’t explain the source, but it guides me through my process.  The way I describe it is … I go to a place where no words are spoken, a place where there is no sound, no smell, even my sense of touch goes away. I am left in a bright place where things seem to be given to me. It’s a wonderful place where I feel I can do anything; a place that I am so grateful for because I can see.

FrankA-PX8-500

Why did you choose San Jose del Cabo Baja Mexico as one of your studios?

I have been in love with Mexico ever since I was a kid and people always think of it as an arty country. They love and respect art. There were only a few galleries in all of Los Cabos when I first came here. I felt pulled to the area for its beauty and the people and the sense of community. Now it’s become such an art Mecca for Mexico.

 

 

 

 

Has living in Cabo San Lucas changed your art expression from living in Fresno USA ?

As my art comes from within, I have to think it is affected by where I am. What keeps my interest is the work which I feel is coming from my soul, the deeper mind work over which I really have no control. I think so much of it is really messages for other people. I have seen this played out in my gallery so many times when viewers to react to the images. It’s humbling for me to see.

 Do you have one sentence that would define your philosophy in art?

If anyone’s art moves you for a moment, then it has done its job.

FrankA-AzulPaseo1000

Chris MacClure – IAD Founder, and Frank ArnoldChris MacClure and Frank Arnold

Join The Party

Guest Blog by Doriz Anderson

Doriz AndersonOver the years, at different milestones, I’ve often thought I had life figured out. A half-breath later however the inclination fell to the floor, and I had to start over. Each time thankfully, it was from an elevated place, on the shoulders of my mistakes and of those who have gone before me.

Crossing the threshold between my waking life and my unconscious, the part of our personalities that is always so secretive and well hidden, causes me to shudder, like when I accidentally fall asleep. You know the feeling. Your head jerks up almost imperceptibly and your eyes get big as the moon for just a split second as you try not to fall backwards into that swirling dream world.

 

When you fall in love with someone, you open yourself to vulnerability. 

When you fall in love with being an artist, vulnerability becomes your mantra.

Being an artist, a true artist means you have to reach deeper – some refer to it as connecting with your soul. I think of it a bit along those lines, but I’m more pragmatic. Yes, it is partially about connecting with my soul, but for me it’s more like connecting with the collective spirit – everyone’s soul, and it gives me goose bumps.

If you’re feeling it right now, and you get it, we just connected.

How does it happen?

Is it magic? Maybe, but no one has a definitive answer. The unknown is what makes life so interesting. For me though, my spirit is more tangible, and, like Carl Jung posits, my decisions are based on the experiences I’ve had and how I relate to the stimuli, whether it is sight, sound, touch, taste, smell, or intuition – my unconscious. What I feel is what I want you to feel when you see my paintings, but I know you can’t do it the same way because we haven’t had exactly the same lives and experiences. 

Everything we feel in our lives is relational. Allegorical mythology is partially about brushing shoulders in a wispy world where there are no words. Every now and then my work has been described in those terms, and it’s always humbling, especially when someone looks at my art and experiences a feeling they can’t describe – sometimes even moving them to being emotional.

I’m not elitist, not at all, but my art isn’t common or does it lend itself easily for casual viewing. It’s introspective, meditative. It’s not necessarily intellectual, but it does appeal to those who look deeper, or at least have an urge to look deeper – searching for answers when they don’t even know the question.

My vision is imbued in allegorical Feng Shui …
reflecting flowing energy, rhythm and grace.

I’m always intrigued when I can stand in a gallery and quietly watch someone look at one of my paintings for the first time. Occasionally, they just stand rooted, staring. My work is mostly abstract – so I wonder what they see. Surely it can’t be what I see, but sometimes, to my surprise they do, and they often feel compelled to tell me. In a time-warp way, we’re virtual  twins joined through thousands of years of relational experiences that forge our mythological and collective vision. It’s literally in our DNA. Sometimes too, art lovers simply like my play of chameleon-green against burnt-sienna. I’m good with it all.

If my vision completes your room, whether your dining area or the inner sanctum of your bedroom, or maybe a corporate boardroom or an institution’s public waiting space, that’s great. If it completes your personal and secret inner vision, wow, even better – everyone wins.

In a way, all art is performance art because of the emotion it elicits from the viewer, but one of the most common forms is cooking. Almost all of us do it every day, but not all of us treat it the same way as artist-chefs like Marilyn Pearson and Vikram Vij. Both of these incredible chefs create inspiring art pieces meant to be consumed not only with our mouths, but also slowly breathed in, and feasted upon with our eyes. Gastronomy, which literally means the “art and science of good eating” is so common we often take it for granted, but it is art, and a very intimate and sensual experience.

Join The Party
The IAD has joined forces this year with a group interested in furthering the arts, performance art specifically – Picasso meets Van Gogh in the world of living art.

Van Gogh Vodka and CHILLED magazine are sponsoring a contest for mixologists to create an inspiring cocktail, and when I saw some of the incredible drinks these avant-garde performance artists entered into the Art of the Cocktail contest it inspired me to create something too – the painting above!

I asked my family and friends what to call it
and they unanimously agreed, “Join the Party

If you’d like to see my “Picasso meets Van Gogh” inspiration, it’s hanging in an exquisite new gallery in White Rock. Follow my blog to find out where and when … cin cin!

Celebrate art and the spirit of life!

Thoughtfully,
Doriz

Abstract Artist & Guest Blogger