Category Archives: Fine Art

Highpoint Fine Art Studio

written by: Maurice Cardinal

©2018 Chris MacClure

Highpoint Studio is the culmination of almost a century of painting history shared between contemporary artists:
Chris MacClure, Marilyn Hurst, and Brent Heighton.

Highpoint, a working studio, opened recently, and shares space with the Urban Décor Centre at 192nd and 24th in South Surrey – just outside of White Rock.

The Highpoint Studio painting-partners gave personal tours to a steady stream of guests at the launch of their impressive and spacious studio.

Each artist displayed some of their finest pieces in a variety of styles.

Highpoint, tucked into an industrial complex not far from the High Point Equestrian Centre, is about equidistant between White Rock and Langley.

Brent Heighton, Marilyn Hurst, Daryl Walker (White Rock Mayor), Chris MacClure

White Rock’s new mayor, Daryl Walker dropped in to say hello.

It’s always interesting to see politicians show up at art functions because one always hopes they will sooner-than-later take the art industry seriously. Ideally, support it beyond more than a grade school level by actually funding an art and culture presence in their community that benefits real working artists and not just students and hobbyists.

We all agree that it’s important to provide art incentive and creative space for youth, and of course for all the retired or semi-retired women who get together in their tea, pot, and gin klatches once a month to paint by numbers. Practiced art today is mostly a kids and ladies game, and for the latter, more like group therapy than art, which would have been good for artists with issues like Van Gogh, but by that standard, it’s not really art unless someone cuts off a body part. 

Commitment to artistic vision or die trying is the missing element in hobby art, but today in the Everyone is a Star era, only the discerning notice the gap.

©2018 Marilyn Hurst

Things are a bit different in our modern times. We now know one doesn’t have to be mentally unbalanced to have great art radiate from one’s unconscious spirit, which means that today you can count on artists to be prolific and dependable. We’re professionals and have discipline, and more importantly, because we do it every day, we’ve developed a sense of observation and vision that is considerably more refined than most of society.

If you’re ever in conversation with an artist and it feels like they’re looking through you. They are. They’re just too polite to say. Old myths die hard. Smart artists have known for decades exactly where great art comes from and how it is produced. It’s not magic, but it is amazing.

Art is a real industry that drives real revenue, but you would never know it by the lack of support it receives from politicians who decimate art and culture budgets without giving it a second thought. They clearly do not understand that art contributes favorably to the mental health and stability of our community. Artists contribute much more to society than they are given credit. Art, organically and holistically, delivers tangible health benefits that are significant and measurable.

©2018 Brent Heighton

New baseball and soccer fields get built, but a “dedicated” art centre that looks, smells, and functions like a real art centre and not an afterthought tacked on to the community sports complex rarely gets even lip service. Art space needs to be more than the empty-building temporary pop-up spaces that cost the city nothing – and of course deliver nothing. Art needs a permanent home, and a solid foundation just like a bank or a grocer. We’re not gypsies and nomads, at least not by choice, although many of us are bohemian and free spirited. I’ve had many conversations with investors and bankers over the years about funding for the arts, and the common stickler for this group is that artists don’t keep regular 9-5 hours. True, we don’t – artists work twice that at least, plus weekends, and we produce a heart-healthy mindful meditative experience that causes people to smile, and think, which in turn leads to happier lives and more productive communities.

All those condos that are roaring up in White Rock, each one should be mandated to provide a portion of street level storefront space for the exclusive display of fine art for international and local artists – mandatory, just like taxes. The same goes for malls and outdoor public spaces.

Hopefully, White Rock’s new mayor Daryl Walker has a true spiritual feel for art.

©2018 Chris MacClure

Considering that art is in large part an intellectual endeavor, it’ll be interesting to see how smart these newly elected politicians are, and if they can deliver funding to support serious art and culture in sunny White Rock, a Mecca for artists as well as an untapped pool of wealthy art lovers and collectors . If politicians are at all interested, the first thing they need to do is make our community culture more inviting for the sophisticated and passionate art patrons who already live in White Rock, South Surrey, Ocean Park and surrounding areas. Many live in lavish mega-million dollar estates and have art budgets larger than most annual salaries. An audience of this resonance needs to be seduced with more than dollar store conveniences. The city needs to offer greater tax incentives to attract high caliber merchants and traders. Tribute bands, pop-up galleries, and ice cream shops have entertainment value and feed the common appetite, but it’s empty calories.

©2018 Brent Heighton

A new high end art gallery, Art Couture, opened several months ago in White Rock’s West Beach dining area. This exclusive showcase gallery hangs original pieces by international artists who also sell their work at auction houses like Sotheby’s, for prices that reach almost two million dollars. Art Couture curator and gallery owner Jenny Xu has the right idea and an amazing space, but without industry support from the city her fate, like all of ours, teeters in the same realm as the neighboring businesses that gave up or were drained by White Rock over the last few years. Jenny is smart and has substantial business experience so she’ll blossom, but most business owners don’t have her depth. 

Art Couture also has international reach for both artists and buyers and could easily evolve to become a destination gallery with a global presence – something the natural beauty of White Rock richly deserves and would carry well.

©2018 Marilyn Hurst

With working artist studios like Highpoint, and exclusive galleries like the White Rock Art Gallery midtown, and now Art Couture at West Beach, the sunny seaside town of White Rock has a much better chance to grow into an art enclave like Carmel by-the-sea Ca, but first our politicians need vision and a Clint Eastwood attitude of Make My Day.

White Rock Mayor Daryl Walker and Chris MacClure

So how ’bout it Mayor Daryl, are you packin’ heat?

Our Art & Culture industry needs your economic support so we can make White Rock great again – oops sorry, that slogan is already taken, but you know what we mean … the White Rock art industry needs money and not just a smile, handshake, and a nod. All types of artists here are counting on your leadership, and so are art lovers, to give creativity and expression a place in White Rock to be reverently  appreciated. Most of the facilities are already here or are being built, they just need direction and to be professionally managed against a global backdrop. 

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Banner Year for the IAD and Artists Everywhere

It’s been a year of major growth
for International Artist Day.

by Maurice Cardinal

Blu-ChrisMacClureSince the IAD’s inception by founder Chris MacClure in 2004, we have steadily gained momentum and visibility in our mandate to celebrate the contribution artists make to society.

When the IAD first launched, Chris would scour the internet looking for a smattering of artists who celebrated alongside of us. Today, the numbers are overwhelming when you go online to see all the artists and galleries in all the cities around the world who do something very special on our official day of October 25. It’s a date Chris chose that pays homage to Pablo Picasso, a visionary artist who has done more for contemporary art than anyone.

Picasso literally revitalized contemporary art and brought it into the mainstream.

The internet is overflowing with International Artist Day celebrations this year in cities like New York, London, Mumbai, Beijing, and all the little bergs and art communities in between. We love everyone who shares our exuberance and respect for art, so let us know what you’re doing to help promote the cause.

The IAD celebrates all forms of art, from painters to performance artists, and this year we are holding up our glasses as a toast, and extending our welcome to mixologists throughout the USA!

Creativity is the name of the game in the art world, and anyone who can stimulate our senses, whether two-dimensional visual, movement through dance or music, or … gastronomical through food and drink, we salute you … Cin Cin!

Sippable ARTWe are honored this year to lend our name to an ART FORM CONTEST launched by the Van Gogh Vodka people and CHILLED magazine, who want to celebrate the creativity of mixologists in each state from coast to coast in America. Van Gogh Vodka also chose one of the world’s most famous artists to celebrate their brand, and to literally bring creative “SPIRIT” to the world of art.

We’ve humorously played up the “Picasso meets Van Gogh” element to bring attention to a national celebration occurring today regarding the culmination of the contest in Charleston South Carolina at the Principle Gallery where the winners will be announced. Stay tuned! There are cash prizes and a double shot of prestige for the mixologist, or as Van Gogh Vodka coins them, BARtists who create the most interesting libations that are flavorful, colorful and designed as a work of art.

We also tip our hats to multi-skilled artists like Marilyn Hurst, a painter and writer who has constantly contributed to the IAD since its inception. Marilyn helped founder Chris MacClure in the early years as they worked together to define International Artist Day – Marilyn and Chris are married to each other. Marilyn recently posted a blog about artist Frank Arnold, well respected international figurative artist, and discussed with Frank the unconscious process of creativity and what it really means to reach into and beyond your collective souls for inspiration.

Chris, a romantic realist painter, and Marilyn just opened a new studio in White Rock with Brent Heighton. We’re all looking forward to seeing what they produce out of this new creative space.

It’s been an incredible year for me too, Maurice Cardinal, IAD co-partner with Chris. Over the last six months I’ve been exploring what blockchain and cryptocurrency bring to the worlds of art. Blockchain and smart contracts are the business tool artists have been hoping for since the inception of the internet. It’s the last piece to the puzzle. Blockchain allows all types of artist to place their art online without worry of it being infringed or illegally copied and sold. Blockchain helps artists get their work in front of interested and qualified buyers in an easy,  secure and affordable way.

It’s a new way for a new era that is proving promising for artists as well as galleries.

Galleries this year around the world are also adopting blockchain and cryptocurrency strategies because it substantially reduces their operating costs and gives them access to a market that previously was insanely and infamously elusive.

Join The PartyAn artist I work with, Doriz Anderson just hung four new pieces in the brand new Art Couture Gallery in White Rock. The canvass above, “Join the Party” was painted after Doriz took a closer look at the artistry of the cocktails created in the contest, and literally felt inspired to join the party.

Jenny Xu, Art Couture Gallery owner and curator, has graciously made space on her walls for four of Doriz’s abstract figurative paintings, including Join the Party.

Jenny  has a rolling hit with her new gallery that showcases exemplary art to our seaside community – with pieces ranging from an affordable three hundred up to sixty-thousand dollars. Jenny seems to already have the attention and respect of local Asian collectors, and is quickly becoming the west coast stage for incredible pieces by highly respected Chinese artists like Xiaoyang Yang, who sold a piece recently, Flourish of Life, at auction for over $1.7 million USD. The Yang image at the left, Tea & Zen hung at Art Couture last month for a very modest $60K.

All of a sudden our little seaside town of White Rock at the ocean, has slipped quietly onto the international art scene in a prestigious way. Look for illuminating openings and events at the Art Couture Gallery in the coming months.

Today is October 25th, 2018, our official day of celebration at International Artist Day, so get out and visit an artist’s studio or art gallery, or go online and buy a piece of art, or … at the very least stop an artist on the street (everyone knows what an artist looks like haha) and buy them a drink or dinner to thank them for the contribution they make to society.

Happy International Artist Day in 2018!

Frank Arnold – Abstract Figurative Artist

By Marilyn Hurst

Frank Arnold - Looking-Manarnold1000Frank Arnold is an abstract figurative painter and sculptor. His work is haunting, bold, bright, and imbued with allegorical symbolism. It is also dark and pulls obliquely from his unconscious – abstract intellectualism personified.

Frank has also produced two books, the first, “Frank Arnold Speaks” is a bilingual, English and Spanish biography reflecting back on his youth as an adopted child, and on his life experiences and the impact it’s had on his artwork.

 

His second book, “Your Creative Imagination Unlocked,” is a collaborative with depth psychologist, Dr. Jim Manganiello. It’s an exploration of his own creative process with observations and hypotheses by Manganiello respective of Frank’s work as well as that of other abstract artists, Cy Twombly, Wassily Kandinsky, Pablo Picasso, Mark Rothko and Banksy. His book explores the deeper mind and how art can be a path to rediscovery of creative imagination. Frank was born in Long Beach, California, raised in the San Joaquin Valley and now has galleries in California and Mexico.

Frank graciously shared his time with us, and his personal insight into the creative process.


When did you get into the fine arts and what inspired you to do so?

It all began for me with a love of color. As a child I won a flower arranging contest at the fair. I was so taken by all the colors and the possible combinations. I have to think that was the true starting point for me.  I got into fine art in school. That was back in the days where if you talked too much, give you more art classes. “Put Frankie in art class because he talks too much.” I was kind of board with school, but my daydreaming fed my creative side and I grew to love art.

Did you ever paint traditionally or figurative work, 
or did you plunge into abstraction right away?

I was classically trained in realism, both painting and drawing. What I found, aside from the fact that realism is a lot of hard work, is there are so many rules to follow. I wanted something to come from my soul. At first I was painting from my surface mind and it was all about me. As I began to work from my deeper mind, I began to feel something was coming to me from another place, something I call gifts from my soul. I can’t explain the source, but it guides me through my process.  The way I describe it is … I go to a place where no words are spoken, a place where there is no sound, no smell, even my sense of touch goes away. I am left in a bright place where things seem to be given to me. It’s a wonderful place where I feel I can do anything; a place that I am so grateful for because I can see.

FrankA-PX8-500

Why did you choose San Jose del Cabo Baja Mexico as one of your studios?

I have been in love with Mexico ever since I was a kid and people always think of it as an arty country. They love and respect art. There were only a few galleries in all of Los Cabos when I first came here. I felt pulled to the area for its beauty and the people and the sense of community. Now it’s become such an art Mecca for Mexico.

 

 

 

 

Has living in Cabo San Lucas changed your art expression from living in Fresno USA ?

As my art comes from within, I have to think it is affected by where I am. What keeps my interest is the work which I feel is coming from my soul, the deeper mind work over which I really have no control. I think so much of it is really messages for other people. I have seen this played out in my gallery so many times when viewers to react to the images. It’s humbling for me to see.

 Do you have one sentence that would define your philosophy in art?

If anyone’s art moves you for a moment, then it has done its job.

FrankA-AzulPaseo1000

Chris MacClure – IAD Founder, and Frank ArnoldChris MacClure and Frank Arnold

Join The Party

Guest Blog by Doriz Anderson

Doriz AndersonOver the years, at different milestones, I’ve often thought I had life figured out. A half-breath later however the inclination fell to the floor, and I had to start over. Each time thankfully, it was from an elevated place, on the shoulders of my mistakes and of those who have gone before me.

Crossing the threshold between my waking life and my unconscious, the part of our personalities that is always so secretive and well hidden, causes me to shudder, like when I accidentally fall asleep. You know the feeling. Your head jerks up almost imperceptibly and your eyes get big as the moon for just a split second as you try not to fall backwards into that swirling dream world.

 

When you fall in love with someone, you open yourself to vulnerability. 

When you fall in love with being an artist, vulnerability becomes your mantra.

Being an artist, a true artist means you have to reach deeper – some refer to it as connecting with your soul. I think of it a bit along those lines, but I’m more pragmatic. Yes, it is partially about connecting with my soul, but for me it’s more like connecting with the collective spirit – everyone’s soul, and it gives me goose bumps.

If you’re feeling it right now, and you get it, we just connected.

How does it happen?

Is it magic? Maybe, but no one has a definitive answer. The unknown is what makes life so interesting. For me though, my spirit is more tangible, and, like Carl Jung posits, my decisions are based on the experiences I’ve had and how I relate to the stimuli, whether it is sight, sound, touch, taste, smell, or intuition – my unconscious. What I feel is what I want you to feel when you see my paintings, but I know you can’t do it the same way because we haven’t had exactly the same lives and experiences. 

Everything we feel in our lives is relational. Allegorical mythology is partially about brushing shoulders in a wispy world where there are no words. Every now and then my work has been described in those terms, and it’s always humbling, especially when someone looks at my art and experiences a feeling they can’t describe – sometimes even moving them to being emotional.

I’m not elitist, not at all, but my art isn’t common or does it lend itself easily for casual viewing. It’s introspective, meditative. It’s not necessarily intellectual, but it does appeal to those who look deeper, or at least have an urge to look deeper – searching for answers when they don’t even know the question.

My vision is imbued in allegorical Feng Shui …
reflecting flowing energy, rhythm and grace.

I’m always intrigued when I can stand in a gallery and quietly watch someone look at one of my paintings for the first time. Occasionally, they just stand rooted, staring. My work is mostly abstract – so I wonder what they see. Surely it can’t be what I see, but sometimes, to my surprise they do, and they often feel compelled to tell me. In a time-warp way, we’re virtual  twins joined through thousands of years of relational experiences that forge our mythological and collective vision. It’s literally in our DNA. Sometimes too, art lovers simply like my play of chameleon-green against burnt-sienna. I’m good with it all.

If my vision completes your room, whether your dining area or the inner sanctum of your bedroom, or maybe a corporate boardroom or an institution’s public waiting space, that’s great. If it completes your personal and secret inner vision, wow, even better – everyone wins.

In a way, all art is performance art because of the emotion it elicits from the viewer, but one of the most common forms is cooking. Almost all of us do it every day, but not all of us treat it the same way as artist-chefs like Marilyn Pearson and Vikram Vij. Both of these incredible chefs create inspiring art pieces meant to be consumed not only with our mouths, but also slowly breathed in, and feasted upon with our eyes. Gastronomy, which literally means the “art and science of good eating” is so common we often take it for granted, but it is art, and a very intimate and sensual experience.

Join The Party
The IAD has joined forces this year with a group interested in furthering the arts, performance art specifically – Picasso meets Van Gogh in the world of living art.

Van Gogh Vodka and CHILLED magazine are sponsoring a contest for mixologists to create an inspiring cocktail, and when I saw some of the incredible drinks these avant-garde performance artists entered into the Art of the Cocktail contest it inspired me to create something too – the painting above!

I asked my family and friends what to call it
and they unanimously agreed, “Join the Party

If you’d like to see my “Picasso meets Van Gogh” inspiration, it’s hanging in an exquisite new gallery in White Rock. Follow my blog to find out where and when … cin cin!

Celebrate art and the spirit of life!

Thoughtfully,
Doriz

Abstract Artist & Guest Blogger

Blockchain & Art

Blockchain is the lover artists have been waiting for, but didn’t know it.

2 of 2 in the Cryptocurrency Blockchain & Art series

by Maurice Cardinal

Blockchain supports cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Ethereum, and many others, and offers artists a solution for the longstanding argument that the internet is an unsafe space, for copyright reasons mainly, to put original works of art online. It’s an argument many artists still make because for the most part they don’t understand how the internet works.  

Artists like to create art, but hate the selling factor so they take lesson after lesson about esoteric elements  like light, composition, color, contrast, texture, this-that-and-the-other-thing. and still their art sits on the floor of their basement or a closet. Technically they are excellent executioners, but no one knows of them in the real world … where it counts.

Frost350-02
Today, thanks to innovations like cryptocurrency, blockchain, Bitcoin, Ethereum and all that goes with it, art dabblers and real artists have equal access to buyers. Blockchain removes all the excuses artists use to avoid rejection. Artists are now standing bare for all of us to see. We still don’t know what you’re thinking, but we do know how you’re thinking.

Blockchain decentralizes the internet so no one person has power over you. It’s a pretty big deal when you consider that the traditional art world works very hard to keep artists subservient. In some cases the relationship is healthy, but mostly it’s designed to control the emotional disposition of the artist as well as the buyer. It’s not rocket science. It’s compliance based on elitism.

Blockchain uses strong cryptography and decentralized distribution to change how we sell everything, including and especially art of all types like paintings, photos, sculptures, music, and more.

Decentralization is the overlooked magic elixir. Decentralized distribution creates an inherent safety net. With blockchain, artists are no longer so totally dependent on others to promote their work.

All you need is your art, an Instagram account, a blog, and an e-wallet, and you can connect with prospects and sell your work for whatever price the market will bear. The rule of thumb is to price it accurately so it reflects your time and talent. If you choose, you can now charge realistically higher prices with less fear of losing buyers because blockchain allows a buyer with meager funds to purchase just a “share” of your art as an investment even if you value the piece in the tens of thousands. Your art can now reflect the true value of the artist, not the middleman. Today, more than one buyer can own the same piece just like owning stocks of IBM. Not only can they buy a part, or all of your work, buyers can display and show their friends too, even when they only own a share of your art. If buyers think you’re hot and that you have the potential to get hotter they can now be part of the discovery excitement, and not only support you today, they can also reap value from their investment as your organic value increases over time.

Most artists don’t understand that galleries purposely keep the number of artists they represent low in order to elevate the perceived value of their roster. It’s based on artificial exclusivity and scarcity, as in “there are no other artists like this artist”. The perception of value is based on what a smart gallery owner can elicit from a buyer during a sales cycle.

Frost300LLong-02Have you ever wondered why many galleries don’t list the price of a work? It’s because when a prospect shows interest the gallery sales agent literally sizes the potential buyer up as they walk towards them to begin a negotiation. They look at how the buyer is dressed, their demeanor, how intelligent they seem, and most of all, their level of interest. Just like poker players, buyers have “tells.” Gallery agents are experts at reading body language in exactly the same way a car sales person operates. The value isn’t based on the organic value of the art. It’s based on what the buyer will pay. Compliance selling is a skill used to create an elite market. 

Blockchain also makes it feasible for an artist to sell a work for pennies if they choose, which isn’t something a gallery can do because they make their fee based on a commission. The higher the price of the work, the more profit a gallery will make. Blockchain however allows artists to put an organic value on their art that works for both the buyer and seller.

Part of the reason blockchain works is because there are no transaction or agent fees. You don’t have to pay brick and mortar gallery owners, PayPal or Visa charges, or online gallery ecommerce fees, plus, if your art is digital you won’t even have shipping fees. You get to keep almost every penny, which makes art affordable and easier for buyers to snap up when they see something they like. All of a sudden the piece a buyer spontaneously falls in love with is attainable.

Frost600-02Blockchain is transparent, and everything you do is tracked, so over-inflating the price of your work  isn’t recommended. You need to be realistic because everyone can trace your steps, which is a good thing and in part how the ownership of your art is protected online. Digital and digitized art now has intrinsic value that can be easily protected and monitored.

Exclusivity is the key to commanding a higher price so the goal is to position the value of your art as an original piece or a limited edition.

Blockchain is a win/win for artist and buyer.

Read the first post in this series …

Contact the author, Maurice Cardinal for more info regarding Blockchain Art

Cryptocurrency & Art

Blockchain Art – Preamble – 1 of 2 in the series

By Maurice Cardinal

If you don’t know what a blockchain is and how it impacts art, you’re not alone.

It’s hard to understand, but once you do, a brand new world opens up immediately.

Almost everyone has some type of artistic talent. With substantial practice, making art is relatively easy, and fun. It’s why so many people do it.

Selling art however is the hard part.

With all the information at our fingers, almost anyone today can be a “successful” artist if they also learn a few basic sales skills, but creative types usually don’t have that type of interest or drive.

Success as an artist means selling your work to support yourself. If you have to keep a day job, or a spouse supports you, you’re more of a dabbler, and that’s fine too, but if you’re serious about being an artist, you have to get serious about the full cycle from creation to selling.

This article is for devoted artists, those committed to creating art fulltime and having their work hang on the walls of others beyond family, friends, and therapy tea klatches.

The definition of a true artist is easier to understand when you compare it to other aspects of life, for example a teaching profession. If you are paid by a certified institution to teach a curriculum, you’re a teacher. If you teach your kid to toss a baseball or cook, well, you’re a parent. Same thing with art.

Statistically, most people today practice art for fun and meditative therapy, and for the calm or stimulation it brings.  A very few occasionally produce something a stranger would pay to display on their large screen TV or wall. Some also pick up a brush or a camera to satisfy a creative addiction. It’s all good, but it doesn’t define or qualify you as an artist.

MauriceC
Giant Joshua Mojave

Consider for a moment that a contemporary art gallery is the prototypical middleman, and similar in some respects to a dating site for lonely artists and skeptical buyers. In reality, one usually doesn’t get married after the first date, just as aspiring artists rarely grace gallery walls. It takes time to form a relationship. Space is reserved for the fulltime and elite artist who already sells his or her work.

Not all galleries are alike. Friendly, and transparent artist-owned studio galleries where artists collaboratively manage the space, and where they work and sell pieces in creative environments is a more welcoming experience for art buyers. 

Artists-owned studio galleries are great places to connect with artists and form long and productive relationships.

We can also buy art at fairs and auction houses, but again these spaces are exclusively reserved for fulltime elite artists in the here and now, or, who have long passed. The cost to buy in is exorbitantly high, however, the quality of art seen in these spaces isn’t always high, as is sometimes demonstrated by art that lacks soul and still sells for mega millions. Perception of beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and especially the beholder who looks at art as an investment.

As the internet blossomed websites presented artists with an opportunity to create one-on-one relationships with buyers similar to the dynamic experienced at artist-owned studio galleries. Progressive artists, especially millennials, embrace the internet and have tremendous success, but in true art therapy style, most still struggle in obscurity and shyly hide their works in their closets.

Social media popped up relatively recently and once again redefined the marketing landscape for artists. Once more, a small group capitalized on it and had incredible success, but most artists missed the opportunity, often incessantly complaining the market had gone flat. It hadn’t though. The art market moved and most artists failed to move with it.

Well here we are one more time; the cosmos, in less than a twenty year span, is offering up yet another incredible opportunity for artists and galleries. It’s a second bona fide paradigm shift in less than two decades greater than anything we’ve ever seen that helps artists not only sell their work, but also protect and make it even more readily available and accessible.

Want to learn about Blockchain & Art … scroll down or click here to keep reading

Contact the author, Maurice Cardinal for more info regarding Blockchain Art